Travels

Visit to Whitby Abbey in Yorkshire

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Panoramic view of Whitby Bay and its abbey

The ruins that today make up Whitby Abbey seem to whistle poems of the great English romantics. Sitting on a magnificent watchtower facing the sea, time around the abbey stops. In that temporary lethargy the echo seems to rumble verses by William Wordsworth. When the dark lurks would not at all disentangle to hear Shelley's torn scream, Heathcliff's tortured spirit could appear at any moment and sometimes, in the mornings, fishermen who approach the coast near Whitby seem to expect the singular flutter of a albatross flying over the place in the style of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

We arrived to Whitby After crossing the desolate and intoxicating North York Moors National Park and visiting the town of Pickering.

As we approached the coast the weather seemed to get worse. Malcolm, the coach driver, told us beforehand that in Whitby the wind would rise very often and it is usually colder than usual. I was not wrong. His knowledge of the earth and the weather was well founded and, once we arrived in Whitby, we got off the bus and we could see it first hand.

Whitby is in the yorkshire coast and from the top of the town you can admire its bay and the imposing silhouette of the Whitby Abbey on the cliffs of the North Sea.

The best views of Whitby are found on Pier Road, an excellent viewpoint to the bay, to the fishing boats, to the bewitching abbey and to the white and colorful houses of the town. In this same place a statue stands in commemoration of the famous navigator James cook who made his career as a sailor in Whitby. In the same place, a statue made with whale bones creates a great frame to photograph Whitby's abbey on the cliff and the bay.

Interior of Whitby Abbey

If you are made of English skin and the cold just caresses your cheeks you have an added bonus: go down the long stairs to the viewpoint and enjoy the place contemplating the shock of the waves of the sea on the breakwater that closes the beautiful picture of the bay.

We approached and proceeded to visit Whitby Abbey. The origins of this monument date from the seventh century and, today, its ruins offer a spooky show worthy of any romantic novel of the nineteenth century English. Not surprisingly, Bram Stoker received the inspiration he needed in Whitby to write Dracula and part of the original novel happens in this same place.

Visit the Whitby Abbey grounds

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