Travels

What to see in the province of Huelva: three travel recommendations

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The natural path of Guadiana

The mouth of Guadiana and Cristina Island

During the days I explored the precious province of Huelva We did a little of everything. In Ayamonte, next to the mouth of the Guadiana, we boarded a ship that would take us upriver, between two countries.

Along the river, sailboats of all lengths anchor in its calm waters. Many have sailed here from northern Europe and are preparing to spend the winter in the shelter provided by the Guadiana. Darkness is upon us when we reach Sanlucar del Guadiana.

The next morning, and after a wonderful breakfast, we await the natural path of the Guadiana. Lush in vegetation and colors, it travels to the river's edge, forming part of a network of 44 stages that run through the stream from its birth, in the Ruidera Lagoons, to its mouth, in Ayamonte.

Deer and wild boar lurk around, and an excrement with crab remains betrays an otter that must have recently passed the path.

Fishermen in Isla Cristina

At the end of the road the bus awaits us to take us to Cristina Island Where we will enjoy the well earned lunch. This Huelva town has a great fishing tradition. Its fish market is the second most important for selling fresh fish in Spain.

The worn faces of the sailors reflect the joy of the end of the workday as they unload their captures on the dock. This is a hard and romantic trade, perhaps in danger of extinction. That is why in the fish market of Isla Cristina they plan an interesting activity: tourist fishing. With it, they give the visitor the opportunity to put themselves in the shoes of fishermen, share a fishing day with them, and, as a prize, delight in the end with part of the catch.

The sun reflects its warm light on the marshes that surround the Island. Here some traditional salinas have a fascinating history. Juan, who thus called a German with an unpronounceable last name who had come to these parts in search of salt to export to his country, acquired these salt mines for his company Biomaris. Over time, rumors soon arrived that claimed that such salt was used to make bombs. When the German died, the salt pans passed to Don Manuel Gómez, and what was his surprise when he discovered that Juan had a brother who turned out to be the most important German spy on the peninsula. The weekly trips Juan made to Lisbon might not be what he always thought.

View to Moguer and tribute to the poet Juan Ramón Jiménez

Juan Ramón Jiménez's house in Moguer

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